It’s more fun to experiment

(Why, yes, I am aware that I used a stock image this time.)

 

Lately I’ve been “attending” a lot of Etsy online workshops (I’m not really sure what to call it when you’re watching a live seminar; anyone?), watching recorded seminars, reading books of tips for creative businesses, and listening to a great new podcast, Etsy Conversations, while I’m up at night.  Do you ever start to immerse yourself in something you aren’t all that familiar with only to find one phrase that comes to you again and again?  Maybe it’s kismet.  Maybe I just needed to hear it applied to something new.  The idea?

Selling is an experiment.

I heard this phrase during the Etsy seminar, “The Art of Pricing for Profit,”  a couple of weeks ago.  It’s the idea that when you are selling something, in my case it’s my art and crafted items, you need to check stats and revisit your approach again and again.  Try one style and see how it does (here, style could mean the style of your work or the style of your selling).  Not as good as you hoped?  Try something else.   And something else.   So, basically, wherever you’re selling things you make, online or in Real Life, it’s always in a state of flux.  Always an experiment.

It’s interesting to me that this isn’t a new concept at all, but somehow applying it to an online shop suddenly seems brilliant (and the clouds parted and the angels sang, as I used to joke).  It can be downright genius when you apply it to your life.

My mind is constantly at odds with itself in that one side of me needs order to function.  In direct contrast to that I also have a need to rebel or argue, to push at something to see how far I can take it before it explodes everywhere. I need the rules, but I also need to be able to break them, without too many questions.  Because of this, the orderly part of my mind tends to assume there are finish points along the way, and my online shops were one of those things that I thought I’d “have done someday,” as in, “This is how I run my shops, this is how I write descriptions.”

So this brings me back to the point behind this post.  Let’s broaden this “selling is an experiment” concept and apply it larger:

Life is an experiment.

There really is no finish line in life, very rarely do people pass on to the next one after tying up all the loose ends from everything they were working on.  Think about it: Death interrupts.  Knowing that you’ll die with a significant amount of unfinished business means that many things you are doing won’t have an ending point.  They’ll just stop.  If you can grok that well enough then think about this:

With everything you do potentially being up in the air, this gives you the freedom to, dare I say, experiment with anything you damn well please.

Pick something going on in your life, put on your science cap, try something new, then note the results.  Not so positive?  Try something else.  Lather, rinse, repeat.  With everything.

Whatever you do, whatever road you’re headed down, you’ll never fail.  You’ll just tweak your experiment. There, now, isn’t it all better?

There, now, isn’t it all better?

Q FOR YOU: What methods of thinking have you changed in order to help you live a richer creative life?

Even if you read this months from now, I’ll still be curious, so feel free to start a conversation in comments.

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